Running in the Rain

Sophie Winter - Brazil


February 13, 2018

On the contrary to some grand metaphor about the silver linings of life, I was in fact, sprinting down main street looking for shelter as the after noon tropical storm set in. As usual I left my rain coat at home, having left the house during a perfectly warm and sunny morning. As the other pedestrians start unfolding umbrellas or were dashing inside of their cars I was racing alongside the road with some stray dogs hoping that I would be admitted entry into a far away store while looking as though I had willingly plunged into the ocean fully clothed. I am still not sure why my running attracted so many dogs, but by the time I reached the other end of town I had a solid following of five dogs.

I often think I should be more prepared, but I enjoy rolling the dice each day.  

Since 2010, the state of Santa Catarina gets on average 100 millimeters of rain per year, when it actually feels like someone gave a hose to a four year old who isn’t quite sure which way to turn the faucet off. Don’t get me wrong I love the rain. It’s a novelty as my small podunk town in America is either a scorching desert, or a frozen winter wonderland, with some slush in between. My interest and joy in the rain is not shared by my family or friends here. On the gloomy, rainy days my family walks slower, they talk less, and are generally more depressed compared to the hot, and sunny days where we flee to the beaches in the morning before we all have work.

The typical rule is if its raining we aren’t going anywhere. At first I thought this culture change was an odd one. At home, if we can get the car out of the driveway we’ll be on our way. So when we started cancelling activities here due to the rain I was shocked. Until I realized a few things. One, I do find it difficult to want to wait in the rain for the bus that on any given day can be an hour behind schedule. Secondly, it is quite lovely to have the whole family at home watching a show together, cooking, cleaning or lounging in the hammocks. Thirdly, it’s been a great conversation starter, with both people and canines.

My host mom has a saying which I have heard several times. “You can only nap when its raining outside.” Which rings true in my household, however it is one of the rules I frequently break. I have learned to embrace my wet clothes because by the end of the day they dry but my memories don’t fade.

Sophie Winter